July 2011

11 killed in shootout outside Mexico City

AP - A gun battle in a rural area south of Mexico City has led to the death of nine suspected gunmen on Monday. People in several cars were exchanging gunfire and police began to chase them, Guerrero state police said. Soldiers also joined the hunt.

www.newsday.com/news/11-killed-in-shootings-in-southern-mexico-1.3051357

Watsco and Carrier to expand together in Mexico

Centredaily.com - Watsco announced a definitive agreement to add Carrier Corporation’s HVAC distribution operations in Mexico to their existing joint venture. Carrier operates from six locations and has 90 employees servicing its customer base.
www.centredaily.com/2011/07/26/2856601/watsco-and-carrier-execute-agreement.html

Despite enforcement efforts, pot remains hot commodity

Houston Chronicle - But for its problematic pedigree, Mexico's marijuana might be hailed as a marketing miracle. Yet, production grows, quality improves and exports northward hum along. Mexican marijuana remains widely available.

www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/metropolitan/7668869.html

U.S. agents sought end to "Fast and Furious"

Politico - U.S. officials in Mexico City urged the ATF to stop the botched “Operation Fast and Furious” gunrunning sting, but their superiors blocked those efforts, an investigation by congressional Republicans has found.

www.politico.com/news/stories/0711/59898.html

U.S. Embassy in Mexico kept in dark about gun sting

Los Angeles Times - U.S. Embassy officials in Mexico did not know about the ill-fated Fast and Furious sting run by the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, in which illegal purchasers were allowed to buy guns to track smuggling routes into Mexico.

www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-fast-furious-cable-20110726,0,904876.story

Part 2: The strands of the Sinaloa drug cartel

Los Angeles Times

The Sinaloa cartel, Mexico's most powerful organized crime group, has its version of a corporate headquarters in gaudy mansions and hilly estates that dot the state of Sinaloa.

But its U.S. distribution hub sits 1,000 miles northwest, in the immigrant neighborhoods that line the trucking corridors of Southern California.

As one of dozens of transportation coordinators for the cartel, Gabriel Dieblas Roman bought tractor-trailers, hired drivers and arranged for loads of frozen chickens as cover. He received the drugs from Eligio "Pescado" Rios, who operated a string of stash houses.

Together they formed part of a pipeline that extended across the country to a distributor living near Yankee Stadium in New York.

www.latimes.com/news/local/cartel/la-me-cartel-20110726,0,6413313.story

Pemex counts 100 workers tied to fuel thefts

Reuters - More than 100 oil workers and contractors hired by Mexico's state oil monopoly Pemex have aided criminal gangs stealing millions of barrels of fuel over the past decade, a document obtained by Reuters shows.

www.reuters.com/article/2011/07/25/mexico-oil-idUSN1E76I27H20110725

Mexico-based daily to target Chicago market

Fox News Latino - Diario de Mexico USA, founded in 2002 as the U.S. edition of a Mexico City-based daily, will begin circulating in Chicago and its suburbs starting in the second week of August, defying the overall decline of the print media.

latino.foxnews.com/latino/entertainment/2011/07/25/mexico-based-daily-to-enter-chicago-media-market/

Linda Christian, Bond girl from Mexico, dies

The Hollywood Gossip - Linda Christian, a 1940s Hollywood star with the distinction of being the very first Bond Girl, has died in Palm Desert, Calif., at the age of 87. The brunette beauty was born Blanca Rosa Welter in Mexico.

www.thehollywoodgossip.com/2011/07/linda-christian-early-hollywood-icon-and-first-bond-girl-passes/

U.S. issues sanctions against organized crime goods

Wall Street Journal - The Obama administration on Monday lobbed economic sanctions against some of the world's most feared criminal organizations, including Los Zetas, as part of an effort to economically cripple groups that pose a threat to the U.S.

online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424053111903999904576468020389386178.html